Posts Tagged ‘police pscyhology’

Police Psychology | Detecting Bombs

by Matthew Sharps, Ph.D. and Gary S. Aumiller, Ph.D. ABPP

To order a copy of Matthew Sharps Book click HERE

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Police Psychology:  Be the Solution, Not the Cause

by Lt. Jason Childers, Texas

We frequently hear about how stressful police work is, and the sacrifices we make in the service of our community is an oft-repeated narrative in police circles. The jerks we deal with on the street, the trauma of violent incidents, rotating shifts, the state of hypervigilance, concerns of personal safety and missed family time are all considered as sources of stress inherent to the job. These shared difficulties help to draw us together as a law enforcement family, but one factor consistently overlooked is that we are one of the main sources of our own problems. The cop staring back at you in the mirror may have more to do with causing job related stress than anything dealt with on the street. The good news is, the cop staring back at you in the mirror can also be part of the solution, especially if you’re a supervisor.
 
How was life when you entered the academy compared to how things are going today? With stringent entry-level standards in policing, most police officers begin their careers in excellent physical and mental health. Along the way, many officers develop signs and symptoms of stress which include poor job performance, sleep disturbances, marital discord, domestic violence, PTSD, depression, alcohol and drug abuse, and even suicide. You’ve likely been through some of this yourself, or you’ve seen others deal with it.
 
But where does all of this come from?

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Police Psychology | How Do We Find and Divert Violence Before It Happens?

Robert John Zagar PhD MPH and James Garbarino PhD

Homicide, suicide or mass murder, are two sides of a coin. Violence is either directed at others or at oneself. So how do we find violence?

Background checks miss violence 75% of the time. For interviews and judgment the figure is 54%, unstructured physical and psychiatric, 51%, and conventional ways combined miss 61% of violence. How can violencethis be if background checks miss 75%, interviews miss only 54%, or exams 51%?

When the current approaches are summed into an average, the combined approach is less than any one single approach. One would be better off tossing a coin than using these conventional ways. Yet 95% of the professionals persist in “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” Einstein defined this as insanity.

This fixation with ineffective approaches is costly.  In the United States, work productivity losses due to violence range from $1,000,000 – $5,000,000 per victim, whether it’s homicide, suicide or mass murder. (more…)

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Police Psychology | Persistence in Law Enforcement

Gary S. Aumiller, Ph.D. ABPP

I saw the musical On Your Feet last night on Broadway.  It was about Gloria and Emilio Estafan and their story of a rise to fame and fortune.  She was the first big Hispanic crossover in the music field and later Emilio keep goinghad his hands in other Latin crossovers that followed like Jennifer Lopez, Shakira, Ricky Martin and Marc Anthony.

Early in their careers, no one would play their music because it was Latin and had Latin rhythms.  It was fine for their record producers to say they were tops on the charts in the Spanish music market, but it wasn’t going anywhere on the English market.  Their record company would not hear of it even when they brought in an English song.  He didn’t want a Spanish group doing English music — no record company wanted that.  So, Emilio and Gloria started playing the English songs everywhere, gave many free gigs and concerts at clubs, blasted it from car radios as they traveled around, got stations to play it out of the blue — they created their own publicity with pure persistence.  They ignored what the experts told them and were being purely persistent.  Life is very much that way, persistence wins out.  But, when are you too persistent…? (more…)

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Police Psychology | THE SHORT LIST OF HUMAN PROBLEMS

Marla W. Friedman Psy.D., Board of Directors-Badge of Life

Immediate Past Chair PPSS/ILACP,  Booklight@att.net

 

In the last 35 years I have provided psychotherapy services to a wide range of patients, in both inpatient and outpatient settings. I have worked with people from every profession. However it is my experiences with veterans, law enforcement and public safety personnel that have been some of the most challenging and satisfying work that I have been involved in.

Over the years I have compiled this list to distribute to patients who are in public service so they can see that they are not alone in their struggles. I do not give the list to every patient, as I want to protect law enforcement from repercussions from the public, as some of the issues should remain private within their profession.

We can all identify with some of these statements but some are unique to under cover agents, dispatchers, firefighters and police officers.   As a result of my good fortune to work with these remarkable and brave women and men I developed this list I call, “The Short List of Human Problems.”

I have bad credit.

I can’t afford the life I’m living.

My job consumes my life.

I don’t know how to set boundaries between my job and my personal life.

I have family conflict that is getting worse and worse.

My relationships with my significant other and children are deteriorating daily.

I can’t feel emotionally close to anyone.

I have dropped my friends.

I feel (more…)

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